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Windows XP

Not a valid Win32 application

Unable to access a network shared resource "Not enough server storage is available to process this command"

Moving Win XP onto a new motherboard

Failure to load Windows after moving from an Intel CPU to AMD

Password protecting network shared drives/folders in XP Home

CPU uses 90% of resources

Error -1607: Unable to Install InstallShield Scripting Runtime when trying to install software

WinXP Home causes network browsing errors in peer to peer network

First logon of XP Pro to Domain create new user account on XP Pro PC

Maintaining, moving, editing stored Internet Explorer passwords

High CPU utilisation by Windows Update

 

Not a valid Win32 application

When trying to run an application from a DVD disc you get an error message "program name is not a valid Win32.Exe".  Autorun.exe may fail to run when the disc is inserted so the intended application (typically a setup program) will not run.

If you Nero Burning ROM software for making CD or DVD discs (often supplied with CD and DVD burners) the problem may be caused by InCd - software which runs in the background to allow drag and drop access to CD-RW and DVD RW discs.

Upgrading InCd will probably fix this. InCd version 4.3.20.1 seems OK.

Nero no longer show this update on their Web site but you download it here.

Unable to access a network shared resource "Not enough server storage is available to process this command"

This issue is recognised in Microsoft’s KnowledgeBase in connection with Norton’s Anti-Virus and IBM Anyi-Virus. The upport site for CA VET anti-virus also lists this problem but gives an incorrect solution. The correct fix is to add a new Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters\IRPStackSize of type DWORD with a decimal value of 18. If that key exists increase the value by 3 until the issue is fixed. Maximum value allowed is 50. (Note other versions of Windows have different value ranges).

 

Moving Win XP onto a new motherboard

Moving a WinXP installation from one motherboard to another may cause Windows to continuously restart the PC without ever reaching the desktop. One common cause is the incorrect "PnP ID" for the IDE hard disk controllers. Read more.

Failure to load Windows after moving from an Intel CPU to AMD

After moving a WinXP installtion from a Intel CPU motherboard to an AMD motherboard with SP2 installed Windows may continuously reboot just after the Windows XP logo screen with the moving progress bar.  That can be caused by a setting used on Intel CPU which fails when an AMD CPU is in use.

If you can read the blue screen error message it will say "STOP: 0x0000007E (0xC0000005, ...", the remaining parameters are not important.

To view Windows XP Stop screen messages go to Control Panel, System, choose the Advanced tab, click the Settings button in Startup and Recovery, untick the "automatic restart".

To fix restart in Safe Mode, Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.

Locate and then click the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\Intelppm

In the right pane, right-click the Start entry, and then click Modify. In the Value data box, type 4, and then click OK.

Quit Registry Editor and Restart your computer.

Error -1607: Unable to Install InstallShield Scripting Runtime when trying to install software

There are a number of solutions at http://consumer.installshield.com/kb.asp?id=Q108340.

But the solution in one Win XP case was not listed and actually was simply the the Windows Installer msiexec.exe was missing from C:\Windows\System32. The file was on the PC but not in the right place. Installing the latest version of the Windows Installer may help but in this case did not.

CPU uses 90% of resources

You may see CPU use reach more than 90% for periods, especially immediately after the desktop loads, caused by pctspk.exe running if you have a PcTel internal modem (HSP56 modem).  Read how to stop this.

WinXP Home causes network browsing errors in peer to peer network 

In some circumstances a Windows XP Home PC joined to a peer-to-peer network may prevent browsing connected PCs over the network. Read more.

First logon of XP Pro to Domain create new user account on XP Pro PC

Joining a Windows XP Pro computer into a domain will probably cause Windows to create a new user account on the XP Pro PC the first time the user logs onto the domain.  This will happen even if the log on user name is the same.  That is, a user logging on to the PC is seen by Windows as a different user to one who logs on to the domain.  As so many settings go with the user (Start menu, program availability etc) this may break many application which were working just fine.  There would seem to be no way to rename the domain user account to re-use the PC user account.  So, move the PC into the domain first and then set up software etc.

Maintaining, moving, editing stored Internet Explorer passwords

When moving from an earlier version of Windows to Windows XP the File and Settings transfer wizard does a good job of moving most settings. But it does not take the AutoComplete entries from Internet Explorer.  These are such things as web site passwords, form entries (such as surname, email address) etc many of which you may not have recorded elsewhere.  Rixler software (at http://www.rixler.com/) have an Internet Explorer Password Revealer which will trawl through IE's settings and retrieve all thses, displaying them in an easy to read format.  Even better, you can export them all to a text file, edit as required and then import into a different PC.

Password protecting network shared drives/folders in XP Home

After providing the ability to password protect shared resources on a network since Windows 3.11 Windows XP has (seemingly) removed this ability.  And this at a time when more PCs than ever are networked and the risks of unsecured networks shares (from network virus) is greater than ever!

However, as Win XP Home is actually the same as XP Pro with certain features disabled some of the missing features can be recovered in part at least.  Thankfully this is one.

I have not found a way to provide a user  by user password protection, or even share level (both were in Win 95/98/Me) only system wide.  WinXP has a built in account called Guest.  The Simple File Sharing deployed by Microsoft uses the Guest account for all network users connecting to the PC  This account can be turned on and off but it makes little or no difference. There is no option to set a password in the default interface.  However, from the command prompt (DOS prompt to us oldies) type in Control Userpasswords2 and press Enter. In the setting sheet choose the Guest account and choose to add a password. OK etc out. Now the Guest account has a password which can be changed etc from the usual Control Panel | User Accounts interface.  With Guest account on any user attempting to connect over the network can now enter the username and password and gain access.

High CPU utilisation by Windows Update

Windows Update or Microsoft Update services automatically check for updates for Windows and Office respectively.  The first step is scanning the PC to see what components of software and hardware are present which may need to be updated.  The second step is to see what updates are installed and the final step to see if all available and appropriate updates are installed.

Whilst the update service makes initial contact with Microsoft's web server the bulk of steps 1 and 2 do not require any Internet contact.  

A classic indicator of a problem is a sluggish system starting shortly after the desktop show with little or no network/Internet activity.  A more reliable indicator is a prolonged period "checking for updates" when a manual update is performed using the Start | All Programs | Windows Update or Microsoft Update on Microsoft's web page (which in some cases takes over 2 hours).

To confirm use the Task Manager (Ctrl-Alt-Del and choose Task Manager) and click on the Process tab, look for wuauclt or svchost with a consistently high CPU usage (over 25%). If possible, use Process Explorer (http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sysinternals/Security/ProcessExplorer.mspx) to check what the svchost that is running is supporting.

Shortly after Windows Update 3.0 was released many reports of this problem.

More recently some reports have this issue reappearing after downloading and installing KB947801, MS08-14 Security Update for the 2007 Microsoft Office System.  This also applies to some Office 2003 installations but the problem seems to start for Office 2003 or earlier users when the Office 2007 converter is installed. On next boot the Update service delivers KB947801 and on the boot after that the high CPU utilisation kicks in if the Updates are set to Automatic.

One fix for this problem is to download and install the KB927891 hotfix and then re-install Windows Update 3.0. This prevents CPU usage running away on system start or when Windows Update is scheduled to run but a manual Custom update via the web page may still gives excessive CPU usage over several hours.
Deleting contents of %windir%\SoftwareDistribution, %windir%\System32\CatRoot and %windir%\System32\CatRoot2 in Safe Mode thereby causing Windows Updates to build a new set of log and cache files and seems to fix the problem completely.

 

 

Last modified: August 04, 2008